Research

SELF-ASSEMBLED CHAINS OF MAGNETIC IRON OXIDE PARTICLES WITH VARIABLE Fe OXIDATION STATE

Isotherms

We synthesize iron oxide nanoparticles in a so-called inverse diffusion flame that can provide either an oxidizing or reducing environment for particle formation. With this method we can produce iron particles that are reduced to low oxidation state such as Fe(II) or mixed oxide particles such as Fe3O4, or Fe(III) oxide such as Fe2O3. We have shown that these chains of particles can be used for arsenic adsorption from water and may offer a cost-effective synthesis for application to water treatment.

TRANSLOCATION OF PARTICLES FROM LUNGS TO INTERNAL ORGANS

NP conc Jul2011 study

Nanoparticles can move from the lung where they deposit into the blood stream and then into organs such as the heart, liver and spleen. Previous studies used inappropriate particles to study this process. We are using Gd2O3 particles that are doped with Europium. We detect the Gd and Eu with ICP-MS with great sensitivity in the organs of a mouse and can determine the amounts that have translocated. We make use of the phosphorescent emission of Eu to determine the rate of dissolution of the nanoparticles.

MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CELLS AFTER EXPOSURE TO NANOPARTICLES

Nanoparticles may affect the mechanical properties of cells by changing their stiffness, for example. We will work with the Keck Spectral Imaging Facility at UC Davis to produce particles that present a surface of materials of interest environmentally and technologically, yet with a core that will allow us to do optical imageing of their location with a confocal microscope.


© Ian M Kennedy 2012